Seroxat Comics – all 3 together

I thought it might be an idea to put all three Seroxat comics together on one post for you all to download:

Comic 1

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Comic 2

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Comic 3

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I’m not sure which one I like best – it’s maybe a bit unfair to pick on poor Alastair Benbow quite so much because Breckenridge was just as useless when he was interviewed on Panorama.

OK – I’m sorry, I’ve had a chance to reconsider that last remark – I take it back. Pick on Benbow as much as you like, he deserves it!

You’ll remember that Benbow is the man, who, when asked on television by pharmacology expert Dr Andrew Herxheimer about why GSK had given no warning about the severe reactions from Seroxat despite knowing about it for 5 years… simply replied “Seroxat has provided countless benefits to many people and enabled them to do more, live longer and feel better… and I think that speaks for itself…”

That reply certainly does speak for itself – Glaxo’s corporate mission statement is “… enabling people to do more, feel better and live longer.” In fact, you can download GSK’s corporate brochure here – it’s entitled “Do more, feel better, live longer”.

Good to know we can rely on Dr Alastair Benbow to seriously address patient concerns about one of Glaxo’s drugs without even bothering to consider the direct question that had been asked.

Watch Benbow in action here and marvel at the way he continually avoids questions.

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Cymbalta follow up

I’ve written previously about the launch and on-going marketing campaign for Cymbalta and the links that Lilly are keen to establish – recasting depression’s association with “vague aches and pains of varying degrees of severity” into a full blown campaign… which may or may not smack of off-label promotion.

Here’s some more on Cymbalta from the Independent:

Was Traci Johnson driven to suicide by anti-depressants? That’s a trade secret, say US officials…

Researchers trying to establish the truth about a new drug – now on sale in the UK – are being thwarted by a government agency whose job is to protect the public

By Jeanne Lenzer and Nicholas Pyke, published: 19 June 2005

When the body of a 19-year-old student, Traci Johnson, was found hanging from a shower rod in the laboratories of pharmaceuticals giant Eli Lilly, US officials were quick to announce that the death could not be linked to a new anti-depressant drug she was helping to test.

During her stay at the hotel-cum-clinic in Indiana known as the Lilly Lab, Johnson had been taking part in trials for a secret new formula called Cymbalta, a chemical cousin of Prozac, which the company hoped would guarantee huge profits for years to come.

Read the full article here.

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