Pensioner on Seroxat Denies Assaulting his Doctor

Or maybe this should be a story about a Doctor who assaulted his patient with the antidepressant Seroxat?

I wonder how much Dr. Ian Palin knew about the drug when he prescribed it – did he bother to find anything out about Seroxat beyond what Glaxo’s drug reps told him?

And what previous convictions for assault does 69 year-old Mr Bradley have I wonder?

Could Seroxat be connected in any way to Mr Bradley’s behaviour…. hmm….

Read on – this from the Derry Journal:

A sixty-nine years old retired civil servant has gone on trial in Derry
charged with punching his doctor in the face in the city’s Clarendon Medical
Centre.

John Francis Bradley from Academy Road, denies a charge of common assault
against Dr. Ian Palin. He’s alleged to have committed the offence in the
doctor’s surgery on May 15, 2006, when they had a disagreement about the
defendant’s continued use of the anti-depressant drug Seroxat.

In his evidence on the first day of the trial at Derry Crown Court before a
jury of six men and six women, Dr. Palin said he had worked as a G.P. in the
medical centre for over thirty years. When the defendant arrived for his
appointment on the afternooon of May 15, 2006, Dr. Palin said he noticed he
was anxious and upset and constantly talked.

The witness said the defendant was being treated for a number of physical
and mental health concerns and during the consultation the defendant said he
had watched a television documentary the previous night which linked Seroxat
to a number of suicides in England, something that made him unhappy to
continue taking the drug.

Dr. Palin said the defendant had been on Seroxat for two years because of
his history of depression. He described the defendant as anxious, nervy and
constantly repeating things.

“He became agitated and began to swear and was verbally abusive to me.
He continued with his complaints and I realised he wasn’t listening to me. I
began to rise to indicate that the consultation was over and I moved towards
the door so that I could open it to let him out”. he said.

“After I told him I felt the consultation could not continue, I began to
rise. Mr. Bradley leapt to his feet. He said ‘you bastard’ and he came at me
kicking and punching me a number of times. One punch connected with the left
side of my head. Most of them were glancing blows and I was able to fend
them off and I tried to hold his arms to stop him punching me and I fended
him off”, he added.

Dr. Palin said the defendant then lay down on the floor in the foetal
position before he eventually left the surgery. He said the defendant said
he would say that he had struck him and that he was going to report the
doctor to the B.M.A. The witness said that following the alleged assault,
the defendant had been removed from the medical centre’s list of patients.

Dr. Paul Molloy who works with Dr. Palin in the medical centre, said he was
holding a surgery in the centre at the time of the alleged incident after
which Dr. Palin came into his surgery.

“He complained that his eye, his left eye, was a wee bit sore. I examined
the left eye. I found it was tender, no bruising with no break in the skin”,
he said.

Dr. Molloy said he took Dr. Palin’s pulse and blood pressure readings but
results did not cause him any alarm.

The trial continues.

Sounds like a real bad assault, Dr Palin – perhaps you should ask yourself what might have caused it, eh?

8 Responses to “Pensioner on Seroxat Denies Assaulting his Doctor”

  1. truthman30 Says:

    Or maybe this should be a story about a Doctor who assaulted his patient with the antidepressant Seroxat?

    Indeed ..

    I reckon this pensioner could claim self defence..

  2. Lynn Says:

    That poor man. It is terrifying to see yourself doing something like that.
    The gall of some people who call themselves doctors. They can’t even face the results of what they’ve done when it’s staring, or yelling, them in the face. How many more stories like this will it take before doctors put their heads together and go “D’oh”.
    Not that I think hitting people is okay; I don’t.

  3. Lynn Says:

    The New York Times, Dr. Klein and a Dr. Stone are still at the spin game, refuting people’s own experiences listed on ssri stories.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/19/us/19depress.html?ref=health

  4. pythia Says:

    If each and every patient on or in withdrawal from this poison started to beat up their doctors instead of taking their rage out on family and friends, perhaps the medical community would eventually join the dots.

  5. youngdoc Says:

    blaming the GP is out of order, recent studies have shown antidepressants rely strongly on their placebo effect anyway but patients nowadays feel everything needs a tablet to cure them. A tablet isnt going to cure their social situation and their behaviour. if you want to make efforts in addressing your depression, talk through it with a counsellor, eathealthy, do exercise and avoid alcohol which is strongly associated, taking a pill’s hardly going to fully fix the matter. To truthman30, 33% of doctors admitted to being assaulted (verbally and physically) in 1 year, assailants werent always 69. A proportion of the British public are becoming more and more american by the day, if we dont give you what you want, you take us to court or try and punch us in the face. Sad situation isn’t it? Its making me depressed

  6. truthman30 Says:

    “blaming the GP is out of order” ..

    Well who else is to blame?, Seroxat should not be prescribed, it has proven to be defective and dangerous.. GP’s should know this by now.. If they are unaware that there has been 4 BBC panorama exposes highlighting the dangers of Seroxat then they shouldn’t really be practicing “medicine” should they?..

    “patients nowadays feel everything needs a tablet to cure them” ..

    I disagree. I think Doctors nowadays feel everything needs a tablet to cure patients..

  7. youngdoc Says:

    “Millions of people have been helped by it and it has been a huge success story for parent company GlaxoSmithKline.
    But for some users it can be an horrific experience with electric shock sensations, nightmares and suicidal thoughts. “(Panorama – BBC news)
    There must be a reason for this, i realise that psychiatry is not as black and white as say Cardiology where logic determines the appropriate treatment strategy. Obviously the “millions” who have been helped by this drug have contributed to research and thereafter evidence based medicine which is used by GPs to treat their patients.
    No drug is free of sideeffects, if you administer a treatment which potentiates serotonin action on the brain (therefore increasing mood/pleasure), on coming off the drug or when levels are at their lowest prior to the next dose, anxiety/agitation/low mood can easily follow. Psychological/personality traits of a patient are extremely difficult to ascertain over several 10-15 minute interviews. Especially since the patient may very well be withdrawn due to their condition. Certain aspects may predispose them to suicidal/self harm/psychotic behaviour and the smallest trigger may manifest this with different patients having different thresholds for exhibiting this type of behaviour. To blame all these cases primarily on seroxat is ludicrous. If thats the case why doesnt every treated patient show these “adverse effects” and the “millions” that have been helped are now swinging for their nearest doctor or slitting their wrists?
    In reply to truthman, i feel some doctors are like that where they prescribe tablets to “keep the patient happy” even though they may have an underlying thought that the pills arent really helping. I feel the root cause is patients unrealistic expectations that “the grass will be greener” if the doctor weaves his “magic” and banishes all the bad things that have happened which have led to their mood problems. If an active intervention is not resounded loud and clear by the doctor, the patient feels the doctor is not helping them. In psychiatry where psychosocial state interacts with genetically predisposed behavioural traits, those patients who expect to be cured by a simple tablet and who quash the doctors advice on simple lifestyle change alone will never be happy, either in their lives or with their medical treatment.

  8. truthman30 Says:

    But for some users it can be an horrific experience with electric shock sensations, nightmares and suicidal thoughts. “(Panorama – BBC news)
    There must be a reason for this, i realise that psychiatry is not as black and white as say Cardiology where logic determines the appropriate treatment strategy. Obviously the “millions” who have been helped by this drug have contributed to research and thereafter evidence based medicine which is used by GPs to treat their patients.

    The reason for this is, Seroxat is poisonous and defective.
    The so called “millions” who have been helped has no foundation , it’s simply Glaxo’s marketing mantra …

    no drug is free of sideeffects, if you administer a treatment which potentiates serotonin action on the brain (therefore increasing mood/pleasure), on coming off the drug or when levels are at their lowest prior to the next dose, anxiety/agitation/low mood can easily follow.

    Side effects or direct effects? ..
    What’s the difference? ..
    One could say a side effect is simply an unwanted affect, and the direct effect is the intended effect..
    But both are really just effects of the drug in their own right..
    Seroxat doesn’t simply have some mild side effects like other prescription drugs, it has one of the worst side effect profile of any drug on the market, the side effect profile in the PIL is practically a novel (and not one with a happy ending.. suicide, hostility , birth defects to name but a few)
    And anyhow, the point is GSK failed to warn of the real dangers..

    To blame all these cases primarily on seroxat is ludicrous. If thats the case why doesnt every treated patient show these “adverse effects” and the “millions” that have been helped are now swinging for their nearest doctor or slitting their wrists?

    The fact is “youngdoc” , most people will exhibit some direct behavioral changes from Seroxat,for a large number of people , theses side effects will cause more harm then the “treatment” is worth.. the benefits do not outweigh the risks , that’s the bottom line here…

    I feel the root cause is patients unrealistic expectations that “the grass will be greener” if the doctor weaves his “magic” and banishes all the bad things that have happened which have led to their mood problems.

    For a young doctor you make a hell of a lot of assumptions about patients ..
    The fact is most people who are suffering from emotional or mental health issues go to their doctor looking for help, in most cases the doctor prescribes these poison pills without therapy .. this is not the fault of the patient.. it is the doctors responsibility to provide adequate care.. unfortunately doctors nowadays are too busy squashing 10 to 20 patients into an hour of their time instead of spending quality time listening to 3 or 4 patients in an hour.. this is down to greed on GPs part, it has nothing to do with patients wanting a quick fix…


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