Seroxat/Paxil and other anti-depressants – tell YOUR story

The drug companies say Seroxat (and other SSRIs) are safe to take, not at all addictive and you may have only minor problems when withdrawing from them.

My experience with SEROXAT was NOTHING like this and I know there are tens of thousands of other patients out there who agree with me.

The problem is that the MHRA and FDA don’t seem to want to listen to us and the drug companies have their profits to safeguard.

I found this post the other day on Seroxat Mad, a great UK forum [but it doesn’t matter where you live – all stories are welcome]:

The Seroxat User Group in the UK has received thousands of testimonies from people who have experienced negative effects when taking and trying to withdraw from Anti-Depressants such as Seroxat. Unfortunately these personal testimonies are not always taken into consideration in drug safety assessment, unless they are flagged up in adverse side effect reporting schemes. We want to build on patient testimonies and use them proactively to help inform support groups for people who have had negative experiences of medication.

If you are currently taking, are trying to withdraw from or have taken anti-depressant medication in the past, you are invited to take part in a current piece of research, being conducted by a Manchester Metropolitan University Masters student in association with the Seroxat group. Contribution to this research can be as easy as taking part in an online survey or interview.

Research Aims
Record people’s experiences of anti-depressants
Look at commonalities in drug experiences and in the coping techniques people use when experiencing side effects when taking or stopping medication
To investigate whether patients’ interests are being served in relation to the receipt of thorough information about potential drug side effects on prescription
To investigate what people would find useful in terms of support

Please contact me for more information, and a participant information pack.

E-mail: claudia.liberatoscioli@student.mmu.ac.uk

Advertisements

New Seroxat/Paxil videos added

I’ve just added three more videos to my Seroxat videos page (see the link at the top of the page). Thanks to the Truthman once again.

It’s an interview from Fox News in three parts with Dr Peter Breggin about his new book Medication Madness.

Breggin has been a long time critic of antidepressants… but strangely none of the drug companies listen to him.

Maybe the drug companies are too focused on their profits to worry about patient harm?

Have a look at my video page and then if you still want more then simply go to YouTube and search for Paxil or Seroxat or Aropax.

Seroxat/Paxil for Pre Menstrual Syndrome – no conflicts of interest…?

In my last post – link – I wondered if Dr Mikael Landen had any connections with GSK and who funded his research, as recent research he had done seemed to show that Seroxat/Paxil would be good for some people to take for a few days every month to ease Pre Menstrual Syndrome:

Doctors are testing women taking antidepressants at the first symptom of premenstrual irritability, a move critics worry could lead to even more prescribing of “psychotropic” drugs to women.

A small new study shows antidepressants work within hours to dampen premenstrual anger and irritability. It usually takes several weeks for the drugs to start working in depression, and months before a maximum effect is achieved.

But studies suggest a popular class of drugs called SRIs, or serotonin reuptake inhibitors, work more rapidly to reduce symptoms such as irritability and anger.

Now this seemed strange to me and others as in our experience Seroxat/Paxil CAUSES anger and irritability, especially when you withdraw from the drug or alter the dosage you take. It would therefore seem a stupid thing to do to take 20mgs for 6 or seven days a month and then stop, only to repeat the process the next month.

Thanks to Bob Fiddaman, we now know who funded this ‘research’:

“The study was supported by grants from Novo Nordisk Sweden and GlaxoSmithKline. We thank study nurses Benita Gezelius and Carin Carlquist forskillful assistance. Dr Brian Hunter at Glaxo SmithKline gave valuable input on the study protocol. Niklas Morton and Gunnar Ekroth provided valuable statistical advice.”

Interestingly enough another study was being carried out into the same thing at the same time – and it was published at the same time. This study took place in Canada.

The detail can be found (once again) at Seroxat Sufferers:

This study was conducted by M Steiner, AV Ravindran, JM Lemelledo, D Carter, JO Huang, AM Anonychuk, and SD Simpson.

The declaration of interests [Financial Disclosure] shows what I believe to be a severe conflict of interests in this study.

First and foremost the study was funded by GlaxoSmithKline, Canada.

Dr. Steiner has served as a consultant to Eli Lilly, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Lundbeck, Novartis, Wyeth, Ortho- McNeil, AstraZeneca, and Azevan; has served on the speakers bureaus of AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, and Wyeth; has served on the advisory boards of Eli Lilly, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Lundbeck, Ortho-McNeil, Wyeth, Sherring, Ferring, and Azevan; and has received grant/research support from Wyeth, Pfizer, AllerGen, AstraZeneca, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Society for Women’s Health Research, Ontario Mental Health Foundation, and Physicians Services Inc. Foundation.

Dr. Ravindran has received grant/research support from, served as a consultant for and on the advisory boards of, and participated in continuing medical education programs sponsored by AstraZeneca, Cephalon, Eli Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen-Ortho, Pfizer, Roche, Servier, and Wyeth.

Dr. LeMelledo has received honorarium and performed clinical trials for Roche, AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, and Merck and has received funding from Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation, and University of Alberta.

Dr. Carter has received grant/research support from Wyeth.

Mss. Huang and Anonychuk and Dr. Simpson are employees of GlaxoSmithKline, Canada.

Honestly, from my own experience (and the experience of tens of thousands of others, the ABSOLUTE LAST THING you would ever want to do is to take Seroxat/Paxil for 6 days then stop, then do the same again each month.

How can these studies have come to the conclusions they did?

We need to know more.

Just take Paxil for 6 or 7 days a month…. every month!

No. I’m not joking… I wonder if Dr. Mikael Landen of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm has any connection to GlaxoSmithKline… I wonder who is funding his ‘research’?

Doctors are testing women taking antidepressants at the first symptom of premenstrual irritability, a move critics worry could lead to even more prescribing of “psychotropic” drugs to women.

A small new study shows antidepressants work within hours to dampen premenstrual anger and irritability. It usually takes several weeks for the drugs to start working in depression, and months before a maximum effect is achieved.

But studies suggest a popular class of drugs called SRIs, or serotonin reuptake inhibitors, work more rapidly to reduce symptoms such as irritability and anger.

Some women are already taking antidepressants continuously for severe PMS, or for part of their menstrual cycle – from ovulation to menstruation.

But the new study asked, how fast do the drugs really work?

“Do you need to take it a few days before the irritability starts, or would it be like taking an Aspirin – take it the same day when the symptoms first surface,” said Dr. Mikael Landen, a psychiatrist at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

His team found that women began feeling less irritable within four hours of taking paroxetine, the active ingredient in Paxil. They reported a significant difference by bedtime, or as early as 14 hours later.

“This means that you can almost take an SRI as needed for premenstrual dysphoria,” Landen said. “You don’t have to schedule two weeks every month. You can wait until you experience your symptoms and start medication.”

All the women met criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, the official psychiatric term for severe PMS where women experience “marked” irritability, tension, weepiness, mood swings or a depressed mood that can interfere with day-to-day activities and personal relationships. Three to eight per cent of women are estimated to be affected.

If the proof of concept study is borne out by more research, psychiatrists say it could be a significant breakthrough in the treatment of severe PMS.

But some researchers are unsettled by the notion of otherwise healthy women being handed antidepressants for PMS. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada says antidepressants can be used in more severe cases.

“There has certainly been a lot of critique about the way it’s taken something that is part of the normal hormonal changes involved in women’s reproductive cycles and pathologizing them, making them into a medical condition that needs drug treatment,” said Barbara Mintzes, an assistant professor in the department of anesthesiology, pharmacology and therapeutics at the University of British Columbia.

“It’s extra-prescribing of an antidepressant for an inappropriate use to women of childbearing age.”

PMS “is a very vague term,” said Leonore Tiefer, a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York University School of Medicine.

“There are many different ways of experiencing menstruation and occasionally there might be an unusual set of symptoms. But, by and large, I think it’s best to dispute the existence of a PMS condition and certainly not prescribe an SRI.”

A total of more than 27 million prescriptions were dispensed for SRIs and similar antidepressants in 2007, according to prescription drug tracking firm IMS Health Canada. According to IMS, 64 per cent of diagnoses for depression made by Canadian office-based doctors in 2007 were for women. “These visits were likely accompanied by a drug recommendation in the form of a new prescription; a drug sample being provided; or a direction to the patient to continue taking a current medication.”

Women who go on and off low-dose antidepressants for PMS don’t seem to experience the same withdrawal as do about one-third of people who take the drugs for depression, doctors say.

“But you do get side-effects – nausea, agitation, difficulty sleeping. You do see a bit of that,” said Sarah Romans, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto and consultant psychiatrist at Women’s College Hospital.

She says women with severe PMS “say stuff like, I’m a Jekyll and Hyde, you don’t want to know me the week before my period. I hide in my room; I’m just like a raging tyrant. My husband just looks at me wrong and I snap his head off.”

But she says there exists so much mythology and ritual around the menstrual cycle that “I think sometimes men are inclined to attribute to a woman’s cycling stuff that doesn’t belong there.”

“Typically she’ll be sounding off about something that’s wrong in the relationship, or she wants him to do something more around the house and they can both say, ah, well, it’s just that you’re PMS-ing.”

“And of course she’s expressing it now during the premenstrual phase, but she’s feeling cross about it and wants it to change all the time. The danger is if she only mentions it at a time when she’s got premenstrual symptoms they can both dismiss it as not based in reality and not a valid complaint,” Romans said. “We dump everything on a woman’s cycle. Anything that troubles a woman can be blamed on her being a reproductive animal.”

In the new study, published in the journal, Neuropsychopharmacology, 22 women 18 and older, all of whom had previously taken paroxetine, were given a 20 mg dose of the drug during two menstrual cycles and placebo during one cycle. The women took their pills once they had felt irritable for two days, and then monitored their symptoms every two hours.

“We found that the symptoms started to get better after four hours and we found significant results at bedtime the first day.” Landen said. The difference was most significant at Day 3.

He says women could take the pills for six or seven days during their cycle for irritability.

“And you don’t have to plan this ahead. It just starts when the symptom arises and stops when you don’t have it anymore.”

Link

Can you believe they really said this…

I thought I’d repost this great collection of quotes from the Glaxo ‘family’ so that we all have something to take away and read on holiday.

And yes, they really did say all these things!

It’s not possible really to measure total serotonin. We do not know with absolute certainty about how any of the antidepressants work.
Alan Metz
Glaxo Vice President for Clinical Development
source: Generation RX

If anyone thought drugs were without side-effects, hopefully that’s over. All drugs have side-effects. We are having to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on lawyers.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
4/23/2005

I’ll be a hero in three years.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer GlaxoSmithKline
4/5/2004

I am sure it happens because academics are very, very busy people, and they prefer to do research than spend a lot of time writing papers. If the industry puts forward a method of relieving them of that chore, then I am sure that that does happen throughout the industry. That would be true generally. Is it a good idea? I think it can be, as long as everybody is in agreement with what is written at the end of the day, the results and what they are.
Sir Richard Sykes

former Chairman of GlaxoSmithKline on the industry practice of “ghostwriting medical reports” and “gift authorship.”
12/7/2004

We have acted responsibly in conducting clinical studies in pediatric patients and the dissemination of the results. We would strongly disagree with any allegation that we have done otherwise.
Dr. Tadataka Yamada
Chairman of Research and Development
GlaxoSmithKline
6/19/2004

Seroxat does have side effects, but these are clearly stated in the information that’s made available to doctors and to patients.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
Head of European Psychiatry for GlaxoSmithKline
10/13/02

I think you have to develop a culture where if there is bad news you don’t sit on bad news. Bad news does not get any better. It can only get better if it’s admitted, understood and addressed.
Robert (Bob) Ingram
Vice Chairman, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals
8/25/2002

We missed something big we missed the fact that the public wasn’t going to necessarily trust us.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
8/13/200

I can’t count on people just to trust us as a company to do the right thing, even though they should.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
10/4/2004

We’re reviewing every single process at the company. The environment of the business has changed after Enron. I believe that there was a lack of trust [on the part of] the public for big business, and that lack of trust has been amplified by a few bad apples in the cart. And because of that, there has been a tremendous loss of trust in all big business not just pharma and that has implications to me as a CEO.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
10/4/2004

Obviously doctors are very busy people, and their day is packed with patients. The question is how do doctors get information about medicines and new research into treatments and disease, and one of the easiest ways is this kind of presentation [”dine and dash”]. We think this is a benefit to both physicians and patients.”
Mary Ann Rhyne
GlaxoSmithKline spokesperson
11/11/2002

We don’t want to be accused of anything about the way we deal with trials.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
6/21/2004

As a knowledge-based industry we understand full well the value of information, and we want to create a climate of openness where the evidence for prescribing our products is clear.
Richard Sykes
Chairman of Glaxo Wellcome
6/19/2004

I think if, if we’ve been guilty of anything over the past few years, perhaps, um, emphasizing entertainment over education, um, we know that’s what patients really want.
Christopher Viehbacher
GlaxoSmithKline U.S. President
8/16/05

My wife thinks J.P. [Garnier] is the best thing since sliced bread.
Christopher Viehbacher
GlaxoSmithKline U.S. President
7/21/03

….there have been a number of systematic studies in humans looking at the potential for Paxil for abuse, tolerance and physical dependence. So actually, there is data to date to negate the statement that it has not been systematically studied, because, in fact, it has been.
Dr. David Wheadon
Senior Vice President
GlaxoSmithKline Regulatory Affairs and Product Professional Services
10/19/2000

No, we are not misleading them [patients]. The information in the patient leaflet and in the information we supply to doctors, is based on fact.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
Head of European Psychiatry for GlaxoSmithKline
10/13/02

We are a high-integrity company. We know what the rules are and we follow them.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
6/6/2004

The vast majority of drugs more than 90 per cent only work in 30 or 50 per cent of the people, I wouldn’t say that most drugs don’t work. I would say that most drugs work in 30 to 50 per cent of people. Drugs out there on the market work, but they don’t work in everybody.
Dr. Allen Roses
GlaxoSmithKline Senior V.P.
Genetics Research
12/8/2003

We follow the law, and we follow government guidelines.
Mary Anne Rhyne
GlaxoSmithKline spokesperson
8/26/2005

This is a company that is reinventing itself … possibly creating a model for pharma companies.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
7/21/03

The evidence, however, is clear, these medicines are not linked with suicide, these medicines are not linked with an increased rate of self harm.
Dr. Alastair Benbow

GlaxoSmithKline’s European Medical Director
10/3/2004

So we always want to make sure we are serving the good, the right purpose….
Dr. David Wheadon
Senior Vice President
GlaxoSmithKline Regulatory Affairs and Product Professional Services
9/9/2004

You can experience symptoms, as you can with other SSRIs and as you can with other kinds of medicines as well.
Mary Anne Rhyne
GlaxoSmithKline spokesperson
12/13/2003

What we have seen in terms of the anecdotal reports [of Paxil withdrawal] is that it happens very rarely.
Dr. David Wheadon
Senior Vice President
GlaxoSmithKline Regulatory Affairs and Product Professional Services
8/25/2000

While GlaxoSmithKline strives to produce medications that safely and effectively treat medical conditions, we’re also committed to protecting the environment.
Dr. Anne Phillips
Chief Medical Officer of GlaxoSmithKline
source: GlaxoSmithKline

As you can see here, few numbers of patients experienced any adverse event after being randomized off [Paxil] into the placebo group and the percentages are certainly very small. But these were the common adverse events seen in that small population in our attempt to systematically assess a discontinuation syndrome.
Dr. David Wheadon
Senior Vice President
GlaxoSmithKline Regulatory Affairs and Product Professional Services Excerpt from a transcript of the FDA Review of Paxil
10/5/1992

I have my iPod and my Bose headphones. You can run anywhere. I’m in a bubble. When I go home I don’t talk about my job. It drives my wife crazy because when we go out she doesn’t know anybody. Socially we see politicians we have to and she knows nothing about the issues. But that’s the way I like it. I want to go home and say, ‘hey what happened to you?’ I have a very demanding job and I don’t want to go home and discuss the same stories.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
4/23/2005

We feel strongly that we have an obligation to speak up both for the millions of patients that Seroxat allows to lead a normal life, and for our employees whose commitment to this important medicine has made such a positive difference to so many people.
Eddie Gray
General Manager
GlaxoSmithKline UK
10/10/2002

My mum, you know, she thinks her son walks on water…..
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
4/23/2005

….recognize that in the final analysis success rests on selecting the right people to work with. If you have the right people, the rest will follow.
Jan Leschly
Former CEO of SmithKline Beecham

If ‘discontinuation reactions’ occur in patients stopping [Paxil], the majority will experience symptoms that are mild to moderate in intensity, and are usually limited to two weeks.
Mary Anne Rhyne
GlaxoSmithKline spokesperson
2005

Drugs like Seroxat [Paxil] have been around for almost a decade and help millions of people fight depression. There’s no reliable scientific evidence to show they cause withdrawal symptoms or dependency.
Alan Chandler
GlaxoSmithKline spokesperson

These problems [’discontinuation reactions’] are just the body’s adjustment when you stop taking medicines. It takes more than that to be addictive.
Mary Anne Rhyne
GlaxoSmithKline spokesperson
8/21/2002

The side effects [of Paxil “discontinuance”] are things like dizziness, nausea, headache, um, and are clearly labeled in the information made available to doctors and patients.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
GlaxoSmithKline’s European Medical Director
Source: GSK’s web site 2004

I think patients have nothing to fear from taking Seroxat.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
GlaxoSmithKline’s European Medical Director
6/13/2002

Experts including the FDA and leading physician and mental health organizations agree that antidepressant medications like Paxil are non-habit-forming.
David Stout President
US Pharmaceuticals
GlaxoSmithKline
10/10/2002

It was quite clear from talking to patients and as a doctor that’s very, very important to me, it’s quite clear that the phrase “Seroxat is not addictive” was poorly understood by them.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
Head of European Psychiatry for GlaxoSmithKline
5/11/03

It’s becoming too easy for many people to attack the pharma industry and hold the pharma industry to standards that are higher than anywhere else. I don’t have a problem with the standards….
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
6/6/2004

Of course we didn’t follow this advice. Of course we didn’t selectively publicize the data. This is not a smoking gun. It’s a stupid memo and there are lots of stupid memos in every company’s file and it is really unfair to look at the company’s action through the small hole of one memo written among thousands and thousands in 1998. I do regret that those memos exist but I’m not going to lose sleep over the fact.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
6/6/2004

I utterly refute any allegations we are sitting on data, that [we] have withheld data or anything like that. We have provided all the data both relating to safety and efficacy in the pediatric population to the regulatory authorities around the world and have hidden nothing.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
Head of European Psychiatry for GlaxoSmithKline
6/15/2003

Corporate responsibility is not just a job for selected people at GSK, it defines the way we do business. Our ten corporate responsibility principles set thestandard for everyone, since responsible business is only a reality if it is practised by all employees at all times.
Christopher Gent
GlaxoSmithKline Chaiman
Jean-Pierre Garnier
GlaxoSmithKline CEO
GlaxoSmithKline 2004 “Corporate Responsibility Report”

The overwhelming view of independent medical experts and regulatory bodies around the world who have seen the data, is that Seroxat has a well established safety profile and is an effective treatment with experience in tens of millions of patients worldwide since launch in the UK over ten years ago.
Dr. Alastair Benbow
Head of European Psychiatry for GlaxoSmithKline 10/10/2002

Human behavior is we know so little about it, and therefore, to try to speculate on a mechanism for human behavior is very difficult.
Dr. Tadataka Yamada
Chairman of Research and Development GlaxoSmithKline 1/24/2001

Sometimes a system indeed hinders your rise up the ladder but you also have to accept personal responsibility. That translates into realizing that it’s not always someone else’s fault that you didn’t get promoted. You have to ask some serious questions of yourself before you point the finger at someone else. Ask yourself, `What have I done?’ ‘What is my role in this?’ ‘What am I willing to do?’
Dr. David Wheadon
Senior Vice President
GlaxoSmithKline Regulatory Affairs and Product Professional Services
10/26-27/1995

If we meet the test of our highest purpose nothing less than making historic contributions to human welfare then we will surely meet our important responsibilities to other GlaxoSmithKline stakeholders, to the investors who put their trust in our performance, to the communities in which we operate, to our colleagues and to ourselves.
Dr. Tadataka Yamada
Chairman of Research and Development
GlaxoSmithKline from GSK’s web site

We are all in favour of this being scrutinized all the time, because it is not in our interests to have a product on the market that is not safe or effective.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline 2/15/2002

I think fundamentally the public needs to be reassured that multinational companies and globalisation are not bad quite the reverse.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
2/18/2003

We take the safety of our medicines extremely seriously….
Dr. Alastair Benbow
GlaxoSmithKline’s European Medical Director
Source: GSK’s web site 2004

First of all let me say that we, as a manufacturer of pharmaceutical products and vaccines, take any report of an adverse event on any of our products, seriously.
Dr. David Wheadon
Senior Vice President
GlaxoSmithKline Regulatory Affairs and Product Professional Services
1/31/2001

If you pay peanuts you get monkeys and we cannot have monkeys running this company.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer
GlaxoSmithKline
1999

Great [GSK] products, however, are not the whole story society expects companies to act responsibly in their pursuit of success. If anything, the fact that our business is about human health makes it even more important that we operate to the highest standards.
Christopher Gent
GlaxoSmithKline Chaiman
Jean-Pierre Garnier
GlaxoSmithKline CEO
GlaxoSmithKline 2004 “Corporate Responsibility Report”

I think to focus on safety is important.
Dr. Tadataka Yamada
Chairman of Research and Development
GlaxoSmithKline
3/01/05

….my experience is that most physicians don’t look at the [a drug safety] label very carefully. And I’m not certain. I personally am not certain whether it would make a difference whether something was in a black box or in a warning section or in a precaution section….
Dr. Tadataka Yamada
Chairman of Research and Development
GlaxoSmithKline
1/24/2001

Responsible business practices are also the key to a good reputation. In 2004, the pharmaceutical industry and GSK continued to come under public scrutiny on how medicines are developed, tested and marketed. To meet this challenge we must act with integrity and be open about our approach to these important issues.
Christopher Gent
GlaxoSmithKline Chaiman
Jean-Pierre Garnier
GlaxoSmithKline CEO
GlaxoSmithKline 2004 “Corporate Responsibility Report”

Our concern is people’s safety.
Jean-Pierre Garnier
Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline
3/1/2003

Anybody who suffers side effects of any sort I feel every sympathy for….
Dr. Alastair Benbow
Head of European Psychiatry for GlaxoSmithKline
5/11/03

Everybody who has looked at this the FDA, American Psychiatric Association, National Mental Health Association all those groups agree that SSRIs, like Paxil, are not addicting and not habit forming.
Andrew T. Bayman
attorney for GlaxoSmithKline
King & Spalding

GSK strongly stands behind the safety and efficacy of Paxil. Physician organizations, like the American Psychiatric Association, have stated that antidepressants are not habit-forming.
David Stout
President of U.S. Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline is proud to offer physicians Paxil CR the latest treatment advance in the SSRI class.
David Stout
President, US Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline
4/19/2002

Talk is cheap.

Sen Grassley investigates GlaxoSmithKline and Paxil/Seroxat

I see that there is more trouble for GSK in America. This from Baum Hedlund:

Senator Charles Grassley (R-Iowa), a ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, launched an investigation of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) regarding its controversial antidepressant Paxil based on GSK documents collected by Baum Hedlund during Paxil suicide litigation.
See: http://finance.senate.gov/press/Gpress/2008/prg061208.pdf

The documents include a comprehensive report (based on GSK’s internal documents, studies and data analyses) from Harvard psychiatrist, Dr. Joseph Glenmullen. Dr. Glenmullen’s report has been provided to the FDA, which is said to be investigating the report, as well as accusations GSK hid Paxil’s link to suicidal behavior.

Concerned about the public health implications of the documents obtained in the Paxil suicide litigation, Baum Hedlund asked GSK to allow it to share the documents with the FDA, but GSK declined to allow the firm to do so.

In addition to the Grassley investigation, Baum Hedlund attorneys were contacted by the Department of Justice for information concerning GSK’s marketing practices related to Paxil. Attorneys from the firm met with DOJ and other government attorneys and staff in 2007.

Baum, Hedlund, Aristei & Goldman has been litigating Paxil suicide and suicide attempt cases for more than 18 years and has a number of cases pending in courts across the United States. The firm has collected hundreds of thousands of pages of internal GSK documents and conducted dozens of depositions of GSK executives, employees, physicians, researchers and academics. The vast majority of the documents and deposition testimony is confidential, however, Baum Hedlund has been successful in getting numerous documents out from under confidentiality seal. Baum Hedlund has and will continue to champion the rights of its clients and the public affected by antidepressants such as Paxil.

%d bloggers like this: