The Seroxat (Paxil) PIL over the years – ch..ch..ch..changes! (re-post)

Here’s an old post (December 30, 2009) which contains some important information:

It’s at this time of year that we all look forward to a new decade and look back on the years that have brought us to where we are today. I thought it would be useful to look back at 20 years of Glaxo spin – to review the information supplied by Glaxo over the past 20 years to patients like you and me.

The PIL – the Patient Information Leaflet is what I’m talking about.

As you download the PDFs and read them, please remember each of the leaflets is referring to EXACTLY the same drug – hard to believe.

I’m very happy to be able to supply what is a truly historic document – the very first Seroxat PIL – click on the link to download it – Original Seroxat PIL 1990.

This is a relic of a bygone age – a much simpler time for all of us. Download it and you’ll be able to read a short two page document that bears little in common with the current PIL. One thing of note is that in 1990 the PIL still stated clearly “Always keep medicine out of the reach of children. ‘Seroxat’ is not recommended for use by children.” Oh… and no mention of withdrawal.

I’ve another PIL for you to download here – Seroxat PIL 1996 – I thought I’d include this one as it is the very text I read at the time I started to take Seroxat. This has some choice phrases in it as well –

“This medicine works by bringing the levels of serotonin [in the brain] back to normal.”

“These tablets are not addictive.”

“If you stop taking your tablets too soon, your symptoms may return. Remember you cannot become addicted to to ‘Seroxat’.”

Back then I believed this – I trusted Glaxo and felt safe in the knowledge that the drug had been tested by the regulators… if only I knew then what I know now – ALL THOSE STATEMENTS ABOVE ARE LIES.

Just for comparison, here is a more recent Seroxat PIL – Seroxat PIL 2006. Please download the different versions – compare and contrast the wording – see which phrases have been carefully rewritten or removed. It’s hard to believe that the 1990 version and the 2006 version are actually referring to EXACTLY the same drug.

And finally, this the PIL from 2008 – PIL.2008

I wonder what the Seroxat PIL will look like in 2015 – what will Glaxo be admitting by then, I wonder?

And by 2020…?

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Stan Kutcher, Stan Kutcher, Stan Kutcher… postscript

Sad to say poor Stan didn’t get elected in the recent poll in Halifax, Canada. He failed by an impressively large margin.

Still, I’m sure he’ll be back at some point and perhaps by then we will have seen Study 329 retracted… it is still on the books, still saying, “Paroxetine is generally well tolerated and effective for major depression in adolescents.

It’s a testimonial to the worst of times, and it needs to be retracted for the same reason that the statues and monuments of despots are destroyed when their regimes finally fall”.

So says a retired physchiatrist, 1 Boring Old Man, in this article.

I have to agree that it’s high time  Study 329 was retracted – and Marty Keller and Stan and the rest of the doctors that put their names to it were put under the spotlight and called to account for their actions.

I know it’ll never happen, but I can’t shake the feeling that Keller and Kutcher played their parts (together with GlaxoSmithkline) in what amounted to a physical assault on me. The study said Seroxat didn’t work, but rather than admit the fact, all parties lied and cheated in order to shore up the profile of what I can only describe as a harmful chemical that should never have been allowed to be prescribed so widely.

The bottom line for Keller, Kutcher et al was the money Glaxo paid them to lie about the efficacy and safety of Paxil/Seroxat.

The bottom line for Glaxo was (and still is) the billions in profit it makes each year.

Who picks up the pieces? – I do, every day – and so do all the other patients that were harmed by what Keller, Kutcher and Glaxo all knew to be a dangerous drug that didn’t actually work.

Read more in Alison’s Bass’ book Side Effects – the complete story of Study 329

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