A history of SSRIs

This is a re-post from something I wrote in March 2007 – on reflection, perhaps it should be more accurately entitled A History of SSRIs and the Damage they do to Patients.

I think there may well be a lot of discussion in the coming months about Seroxat dependency and the terrible withdrawal symptoms that many people have to endure as they try to stop taking Seroxat and so I think that the download – A History of SSRIs  is more relevant today than ever.

Looking at my original post, I was remiss as I didn’t credit the author of the download – so belated apologies to Prof David Healy (I think it’s his piece).

Now read on:

Over the years I have collected a few interesting documents and I think it’s just plain selfish to keep them to myself so I’m starting to share them with you.

The one for download here – A History of SSRIs is exactly what it says it is… a history of SSRIs.

You can read about the first SSRI – Zelmid – which was patented in 1972 and made it to market in 1982 before any of the others. I suppose not many of you remember Zelmid though as it was discovered in rare cases to cause a serious neurological disorder called Guillain-Barré Syndrome. This potentially fatal disorder led to the immediate removal of the drug from the market.

But Astra had already begun the development of a derivative of Zelmid, called alaproclate, when Zelmid ran into trouble. Alaproclate was being investigated for both depression and Alzheimer’s disease. But it caused liver problems in one strain of laboratory mice and this was enough to lead Astra to drop it. Shortly after this, Astra introduced an innovative antipsychotic, remoxipride, which looked like it would have significantly fewer side effects than older agents. Several months after its launch, however, remoxipride was reported to cause aplastic anemia in a small number of people and it too was withdrawn.

Notice a pattern here?

And did you know this about Prozac? As Eli Lilly were trying to launch Prozac in Germany they came up against a slight problem with the view of the German regulators on fluoxetine (Prozac) as of May 1984: “Considering the benefit and the risk, we think this preparation totally unsuitable for the treatment of depression”.

A History of SSRIs is an enlightening document – with a large section on Seroxat…

 

 

How addictive is Seroxat?

All this talk about Seroxat addiction and withdrawal reminded me of a post that I wrote back in 2007… I think it would be very interesting to see the data from the studies that Dr Wheadon spoke about while under oath in California.

Especially given what we now know about the lies GSK told about Study 329.

seroxat secrets...

You might think that after all the years of doctors and patients all around the world saying Seroxat is highly addictive – oops, sorry, causes dependence and severe withdrawal reactions – that Glaxo would simply undertake the definitive study to prove us all wrong and to show the world once and for all really how safe and non-addictive Seroxat is…

Well, the truth is Glaxo could have done this years ago but it has not. Why? I leave that simple question to you to answer.

In fact, the official Paxil prescribing information (produced by Glaxo, current version) confirms this by saying:

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE
Controlled Substance Class: PAXIL is not a controlled substance.
Physical and Psychologic Dependence: PAXIL has not been systematically studied in animals or humans for its potential for abuse, tolerance or physical dependence…

Again, I ask Glaxo why have no systematic studies been done? Why not…

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Seroxat/Paxil Study 329 – the truth at last.

I’m feeling re-energised today for a number of reasons, one of them being the fact that I’ve discovered the final chapter in the story of Study 329 has arrived.

I suggest you visit Restoring Study 329 for the latest news.

Also have a look here at Bob Fiddaman’s excellent take on today’s news.

If you don’t already know, Study 329 is arguably the most controversial drug study ever, published in July 2001.

In a nutshell Study 329:

– concluded that Seroxat was a safe and effective medication for treating major depression in adolescents;
– is still widely cited in the medical literature, providing physicians with assurance about the usefulness of paroxetine;
– was criticised by a few alert and concerned journalists, academics and bloggers. (However, their voices were buried by a tsunami of positive marketing and promotion by vested interests);
– resulted in a successful New York state fraud lawsuit against GSK;
– resulted in 2012 in the biggest fine in corporate history – $3 Billion,
and
– remains unretracted.

I have written about the scandal of Study 329 for many years and this link collects my posts about the Study 329.

From one blunt Yorkshireman to another – I hope you’re paying attention Andrew Witty, this hasn’t gone away… oh, and I don’t just mean Study 329.

Fortitude Law & the Seroxat Group Action in the UK

It’s been going on far too long – and it’s not over yet.

I’m talking about the High Court action against GlaxoSmithKline that is being taken by a group of UK patients who are determined to finally have their day in court confronting GlaxoSmithKline.

It’s a long story and goes back 10 years or more. It’s also a complicated story and one which I am sure will be told in full one day.

You can find the full details of the Seroxat Group Action here at the Fortitude Law website:

Following the halt of the Seroxat Group Action in 2010 when public funding was withdrawn, Claimants determined to continue with their claims for compensation have turned to Fortitude Law. We are now set to return to Court and confront GlaxoSmithKline (UK) Ltd. with evidence of the harm they suffered as a consequence of having become dependent upon the antidepressant, Seroxat. Fortitude Law is working with Counsel Jacqueline Perry QC and Niazi Fetto, 2 Temple Garden Chambers, London to represent 105 Claimants in their High Court claims.

Patients were reassured by their GPs that unlike other antidepressants, they would be able to stop taking Seroxat whenever they wanted. Instead, over 6,000 individuals advised their GPs that each time they reduced their dose they suffered bizarre and debilitating symptoms not previously experienced. These symptoms often included impulsive suicidal thoughts, thoughts of self harm and uncharacteristic aggressive behavior. Their withdrawal symptoms were so severe that the only way they could be avoided was to return to their previous daily dose. 

To see the genesis of this litigation, which first commenced with the BBC’s Panorama Programme ‘Secrets of Seroxat’ first shown in 2002, visit news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/panorama/2310197.stm

 

What I believe – 2

I’m reposting this for a couple of reasons – the first is that I haven’t written anything for a while (that’s an understatement!) and secondly, if that’s going to be the case again, I think this is the perfect post to greet anyone who may arrive here for the first time.

It still amazes me that people are still being prescribed Seroxat in 2015 – and also that so many Doctors still seem to be ignorant about the possible problems that many patients can have when the try and withdraw from this drug. That’s not to mention the problems associated with long-term use of Seroxat.

Glaxo thinks it’s all gone away…

seroxat secrets...

I believe Seroxat is defective and dangerous.

I believe that Glaxo has hidden clinical trial data that shows exactly how dangerous a drug it is.

I believe that Seroxat is addictive.

I believe that Seroxat can cause anger, aggression and violence.

I believe that something must be done to help people who suffer terrible problems with withdrawal, as they desperately try to stop taking Seroxat.

I believe that doctors have taken large sums of money from Glaxo to lie about the efficacy and safety of the drug.

I believe that GlaxoSmithKline puts profits before patients – their wealth before our health.

I took Seroxat for 9 years and it took me 22 months to withdraw from the drug little by little.

Believe me – I know what I’m talking about.

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What I believe

I believe Seroxat is defective and dangerous.

I believe that Glaxo has hidden clinical trial data that shows exactly how dangerous a drug it is.

I believe that Seroxat is addictive.

I believe that Seroxat can cause anger, aggression and violence.

I believe that something must be done to help people who suffer terrible problems with withdrawal, as they desperately try to stop taking Seroxat.

I believe that doctors have taken large sums of money from Glaxo to lie about the efficacy and safety of the drug.

I believe that GlaxoSmithKline puts profits before patients – their wealth before our health.

I took Seroxat for 9 years and it took me 22 months to withdraw from the drug little by little.

Believe me – I know what I’m talking about.

RxISK – Making medicines safer for all of us

This is good.

Here’s a new website that Prof David Healy’s involved with. RxISK is a free, independent drug safety website where you can research a prescription drug to see what side effects have been reported and also share your experience and get a free RxISK Report to take to your doctor if need be.

This from RxISK:

A Good Drug is a chemical + Good Information. Most of the information on what drugs actually do is missing. Only you can provide it. Using RxISK will tell you more about the drugs you are prescribed than anything else will. By reporting to RxISK you can help make Good Drugs. Less than 5% of drug side effects are reported. Your voice has been silenced – globally.

Little is known about the effects of drugs on our hair, sex and relationships, violent and other extreme acts or thoughts, and our skin and nails, because these effects are not considered medically significant and are not tracked.

We have created the RxISK Zones with two purposes in mind:

  1. To enable you to easily search for prescription drug side effects on hair, sex, violence, suicide, and other aspects of our every day lives in the more than three million adverse drug event reports filed with the FDA since 2004, as well as our expanding RxISK database.
  2. To make it even easier for you to report these types of prescription drug side effects on RxISK.org and with your country’s drug regulator or the FDA if we don’t yet have your country’s form.

Just imagine — by reporting your experiences, you can help make RxISK the most comprehensive source of independent information on drug side effects in these important personal areas.

How it works

At the bottom of any Zone page, simply enter a prescription drug and click Continue. On the following summary page, check the box next to any side effect you are experiencing, and click the Report a drug side effect button to quickly create your personalized RxISK Report with your RxISK Score to take to your health care professional to help them help you.

The page is here if you want to add to the real world knowledge available about the drugs you take.

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